Audio

Super Soundtrack: Silent Night, Deadly Night (1984)

Though this blog is Halloween Shindig, we’ve been known to take brief holiday detours once Christmas rolls around. Particularly for a film that is near and dear to our hearts….

Primarily this is because Halloween Shindig is a music blog and one of our favorite things about Silent Night, Deadly Night is its unique and original Christmas soundtrack.

5 years ago, when this blog was in its infancy, we posted 2 songs and several crummy gifs (now revamped) from the film.  We also asked if anyone knew where we could find the rest of this bizarre music. Of course no one did, because no one knew and no one reads this blog.

However, Death Waltz Records apparently heard our Christmas prayers.

A few years back, they released a double-album featuring not only the unreleased soundtrack by Morgan Ames but also the erratic and beautifully atonal synth score from Perry Botkin. Double bonus.

We thought, it being Christmas and all, that this was a perfect time to roll out a second Super Soundtrack, and give the entire OST and score a little extra Shindig magic.

This Super Soundtrack comes complete with all the original Morgan Ames tracks from the film (plus a bonus track!) and the majority of the Perry Botkin score, all arranged chronologically with tons of great samples to wrap it up in a naughty Christmas bow. We hope you enjoy this gift as much as we do.


Click Silent Night, Deadly Night Super Soundtrack to download a zip file containing all the songs, the artwork and an iTunes playlist file!

Or you can stream it directly below!

So grab a carton of milk and relax under a tiger painting to this festive audio offering.

A few notes here on this amazing album:

This soundtrack is nuts.

What I imagine happened was that either the producers didn’t have the budget to shell out for actual Christmas music or no one was willing to give them the rights to use that music in such a context. Or the 3rd option that they just wanted to have an amazing soundtrack filled with new and interesting Christmas music.

Whatever the reason, what emerged was an absolute gem of an album, both as a Soundtrack and just a good-ole-fashioned Christmas album. Some of these tracks sound so legit you’d almost believe they were actual, pre-existing Christmas songs: specifically, the festive carol Christmas Fever and the subtly unnerving Santa’s Watching, a tune which characters even reference during the movie, adding to its legitimacy.

The original title for Silent Night, Deadly Night was Slay Ridewhich is a pretty outstanding title on its own. It was pitched, backed, filmed and even edited with this title, only changing in the last minute for reasons unbeknownst to this blog.

As such, Morgan Ames whipped up one hell of an (almost) Title Track for that movie which, unfortunately,  is not featured in the final cut, despite being listed in the credits. For years this drove me nuts. “Slayrider? What fucking song is that?! I need to hear this song immediately! What is this nonsense!?”

The silver lining, of course, is that it exists, someone found it and then decided it was a good idea to finally release it. They were right, because it’s an awesome song. A song I wish was actually featured in the movie, however out of place it may have been there.

Also, the official Death Waltz release contains 2 other songs that I decided to omit from the Super Soundtrack, I Want To Sing You a Love Song and Christmas Party.

These songs aren’t particularly memorable nor are they featured in the film (or even listed in the credits) and so are extraneous in my estimation. I apologize if you really like them. My guess is, you won’t lose any sleep over it.

In closing, I’d just like to say that I really can’t properly express how stoked I was when this album was released. I honestly never thought it would happen. And not just to finally have access to full versions of Christmas Flu or It Must Be Christmas, or to finally hear (and be overcome with Christmas joy over) Slayrider, but because Perry Botkin’s score is absolutely bonkers. It really is as unsettled and layered as Billy’s psyche and works perfectly to express that unbalanced nature.

I love it, and I hope you will love this blending of the many sounds of Silent Night, Deadly Night.
Merry Christmas!

Audio

L’alba Dei Morti Viventi

TRACK #174:

L’alba Dei Morti Viventi by Goblin

When George Romero’s highly anticipated sequel to Night of the Living Dead hit Europe, Dario Argento recut it as Zombi. This is why sometimes you’ll see Fulci’s Zombi titled Zombi 2. Which can get get a little extra confusing by the time you get to Zombi 3 and 4…

but I digress.

Dawn of the Dead’s soundtrack features a bevy of strange, incidental musical arrangements (like Track #89 The Gonk) but the actual score was composed by frequent Argento collaborators Goblin. And though it plays more prominently in Dario’s European cut, some of the tracks ring out through all versions of the film.

Most especially this tune, L’alba Dei Morti Viventi, which roughly translates to “Dawn of the Living Dead.” Seems appropriate.

Here’s Goblin again, at the top of their game, the height of their popularity and firing on all cylinders,… just before breaking up entirely. At least for little while anyway.

 

Audio

Profondo Rosso

TRACK #173:

Profondo Rosso by Goblin

Despite being represented on the original Halloween Shindig mix CD back in ‘02, or their standing as the Horror Themes icon since this site launched, Italian Prog outfit Goblin has yet to see any action in 170 tracks. What gives?

Well, they’ve always just kinda gotten shuffled around. Maybe it didn’t felt like quite the right moment, or maybe some other song seemed better to load up next. “Yeah, we’ll get to them later” always seemed like the move.

Whatever the reason, we’re correcting that this year with a solid block of voltage-controlled chaos from Claudio Simonetti, Massimo Morante and Fabio Pignatelli.

Let’s begin at the beginning. First up from the boys is from their first foray into the world of horror scoring, Dario Argento’s Profondo Rosso. And when it comes to Italian horror scores, this ones a doozy.

Originally named Cherry Five, Goblin actually changed their name to Goblin specifically for this soundtrack. See, they had a debut album due out as Cherry Five, and they didn’t want any confusion regarding their output.

That was until this song blew up all over Italy.

Profondo Rosso, much (I’m sure) to everyone’s surprise, was a legitimate #1 hit in Italy in 1975, spending 5 weeks in the top slot. Not bad for the bands first stab at scoring. Particularly considering they stepped in last minute,…almost literally.

Original composer Giorgio Gaslini was either fired or quit (depending on which Wikipedia article you believe) and Goblin was asked to fill his shoes. Supposedly Dario’s original choice, Pink Floyd, turned down the offer.

Dunno if I believe that either. Nor is it disappointing to hear, as I believe Goblin performed the tasked exceptionally and I’m not sure how well Roger and the guys from Floyd would have fared.

But I digress.

Argento supposedly gave Goblin a night to write the new score and then the following day to record it. I’m not sure how true that is, but it sounds cool and I want that to be the story, so I’m choosing to believe it. Because to bust out the score for a horror movie, particulary this score, on-the-fly mind you, and have it reach number #1 on the charts is absolutely insane.

Here’s the song that put Goblin on the map, in more ways than one, and (with help from Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells) shaped the sound of horror to come.

 

Audio

The Theme from The Fog

TRACK #172: 

The Theme from The Fog by John Carpenter

This is Stevie Wayne here, your night light, on fabulous 1340 Shindig Radio, spinning the tunes for you all October long.

Halloween is just around the corner now, and I’ve got a solid block of spooky synth songs to shake your Samhain soiree. No singin’, just the smooth buzz of oscillating vibrations to give you and your guests the shivers.

This first one goes out to the men on the Seagrass. Watch out for that fog bank you’ll say isn’t there until all of a sudden it is. It’s filled with ghost pirates, and Garfield  won’t be there to bail you out.

Unil then, keep it here on Shindig Radio, and we’ll take you right into the witching hour. 

 

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The Haunted Mansion Theme

TRACK #141:

The Haunted Mansion Theme by Buddy Baker & Xavier Atencio

I’ll start this off with the perhaps blasphemous admission (particularly considering my Southern California residence) that I have never been to Disneyland. I’ve heard every reaction, so feel free to engage in whichever one comes most naturally to you.

It goes without saying then, that I have also never been on The Haunted Mansion ride. Though, if I were to visit the happiest place on earth, it would probably be for the explicit purpose of doing just that.

I have, however, heard its theme song an innumerable amount of times and it’s pretty damn Halloweeny, so I would be rather remiss to omit it from a playlist such as this.

There’s a lot of great voice talent on display in this old, fun tune from the 50’s. It’s great to think a song this old still plays in the halls of The Mansion some 60 odd years since its inception.
In a world that perpetually moves on, upgrades and reboots, it’s just nice to know Eddie Murphy isn’t cackling his way through some Rick James produced ghost-rap. Though honestly, having just type this out, that actually sounds pretty fucking awesome. But the Mansion is still better off without such nonsense, regardless of how much I desperately want to hear that song now.

I’ve collided the tune with the ride’s own spoken intro for a little extra spookiness. So grab a hatbox, your death certificate and don’t close your eyes! It’s time for Disney’s Haunted Mansion!

 

Audio

Friday The 13th Part 3 Theme

TRACK #123:

Theme From Friday The 13th Part 3  by Hot Ice

It may not be Harry Manfredini’s classic score but the Theme From Friday The 13th Part 3  by Hot Ice is as bad news as any horror theme you can throw at me.

Spooky, synthy and down right Halloweeny, it’s one of my favorite horror themes ever. Even those partiers unfamiliar with its origins won’t question this instrumental inclusion on your Halloween playlist, so perfectly suited is it.

With a creepy theremin-like lead line  and a thumping baseline, Hot Ice delivered the goods, even if it was for an installment I’m less excited about.

Yeah, I’m not crazy about Part 3. I like it, don’t get me wrong and it has a lot going for it but if I’m ranking the first 5, it  probably looks something like 2, 1, 5, 4, 3 today. On the 10 film spectrum though, that puts it right about in the middle, assuming I don’t sock 6 or 7 above it, which sometimes I do. Why you ask?

Welp, it’s the kills. They’re a little lazy I think and the 3D (a gimmick I appreciated in the bad old days) actually hinders rather than enhances.

It almost appears as though the filmmakers were hoping the 3rd dimension would make any old bullshit look cool. It doesn’t.
Jason’s first hockey mask adorned kill is a great example of this. It should be intense, up close and gory. Instead he fires a harpoon across a dock, right at the audience’s face and into the eye of his young prey. It’s suppose to be cool, I guess. It’s not. Not even in 3D. It’s just weak. And lazy. Literally lazy. He fires a harpoon 20 yards. It’s whack as fuck. At least he looks like a badass tossin’ the gun down. There’s that I guess.

However, part 3 does have some stuff that makes it worthwhile. First and foremost, it’s from the early 80’s which just suites the Jason/Summer Camp/Slasher vibe better. The hockey mask makes its debut, there’s some great shots of Jason unmasked (including a horrifying final sequence), some fun assholes you really wanna see die, particularly Shelley and definitely this theme by Hot Ice.

 

Audio

Night Of The Demons Theme

TRACK #108:

Night Of The Demons Theme by Dennis Michael Tenney

There are few Halloween movies I love as much as Night of Demons. It satisfies all the criteria for a Halloween horror hit. If you’ve never had the pleasure of seeing it, click here for some reasons why it should be playing right now on your television set. Or better yet, just click this to watch the fucker immediately on whatever screen you happen to be reading this. To hell with the rest of my post. You’ll hear the song right off the bat and see the real animations where these GIFSs originated.

Seriously. I won’t be hurt. You’ll be watching Night Of The Demons and my goal will have been actualized instantaneously.

Still here? Alright, fair enough. Maybe you’ve already seen it. Or maybe you’ll just wait. Or maybe you don’t care at all about watching Night Of The Demons. If so, you’re probably not reading this either, so who cares about you? Why am I continuing to address you? Back to people who care!

One of the things I love most about Night the Demons is this great theme from director Kevin Tenney’s brother Dennis and the awesome opening credit sequence which it accompanies.  

What better way to kick off a Halloween gore fest than with some seasonal synth and some simple, spooky animations? A solitary glowing Jack-O-Lantern and some scarier synth? Yeah, maybe you’re right. But there ain’t no gore in Carpenter’s original, so my statement still stands.

So, if you’ve already had your fill of Michael Myers, pull up a chair and spend All Hallo’s with Angela, Stoogie, Sal, Suzanne and the rest of the demons gang. You may not live to regret it.

 

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The Munster’s Theme (with lyrics)

TRACK #84:

The Munsters Theme (with lyrics) by Jack Marshall & Bob Mosher

Everybody loves The Munsters’ foot stompin’ surfy theme, but Jack Marshall’s tune actually had some lyrics to go with it.

Written by the show’s producer Bob Mosher, this version of the theme was never featured on the show.

However, thanks to the album At Home With the Munsters, fans are given a chance to hear this more typical sounding theme.

It may be a little slower, and definitely not better, but it does feature some clever lyrics and even a nod to our hallowed holiday. Shindig approved!

I led the track it with a clip from The Munsters’ Revenge, a TV movie produced in 1981 which actually takes place around Halloween, and features The Munsters at 2 different Halloween parities. Finally.

Because, every evening is Halloween, at The Munsters!

 

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The Munster’s Theme

TRACK #83:

The Munsters’ Theme by Jack Marshall

Speaking of iconic, it’s high time we talked about the most iconic family in all of horror-dom, The Munsters.

Though only lasting 2 seasons, Herman, Lily, Grandpa, Eddie and Marylin Munster have lingered on, long past their short stint on the airwaves to become some of horrors most beloved characters.

With such talented actors as Yvonne DeCarlo, Al Lewis and Fred Gwynne hamming it up in such great costumes and make-up, it’s not hard to understand why the show has remained so wonderful to watch and still manages to capture new generations of viewers.
So loved are The Munsters, they’ve been revisited and recast more times than just about anything in the genre, with 5 separate actors playing Herman, Grandpa and Lily, and 7 stepping into the role of Eddie. Marilyn still has the most though, at 9, including 2 actresses (Beverly Owen and Pat Priest) during the show’s initial run. That’s pretty crazy.

However for fans, these revisits have run the gamut from quaint and acceptable (1981’s The Munster’s Revenge) to somewhat watchable (1995’s Here Come The Munsters) to the flat-out cringe inducing (the ill-advised, ill-conceived and ill-received The Munsters Today.) The latter, a rebooted, sequel-series that aired from 1988 to 199, somehow managed to stay on the air an entire season longer than the original show, though only producing roughly the same number of episodes.

While each installment has something of merit (The Munster’s Today does feature a rather good turn from Howard Morton as Grandpa) nothing quite matched or lived up to the series. Even 1966’s Munster, Go Home! (the closest to actually feeling like the show) is hampered by the decisions to film in color, recast Marilyn and lose the laugh track.

All that said, perhaps the most iconic aspect of the show is its oft played, oft covered and oft imitated theme song composed by Jack Marshall. If you’ve ever seen the un-aired (and colorized!) pilot for the show, you know just how instrumental Jack’s theme really was.

Instantly recognizable, it’s one of the great television themes of all-time, and just about every rehash (including Munster, Go Home!) has either failed to include it, or used some seriously bastardized version (The Munsters Today) that feels egregious.

Though they were changed a bit between seasons 1 and 2, I’m not quite sure which I honestly prefer most. I’ve included the season 2 theme on the Shindig because I believe it’s the one most often referred to, covered and imitated. Also, The Los Straitjackets’ version appears later in playlist, and that definitely has a distinctly Season 1 sound.
So, let’s spend some time on the Shindig with America’s First Family of Fright, The Munster.

 

Audio

The Trioxin Theme (Main Title)

TRACK #79:

The Trioxin Theme (Main Title) by Francis Haines

It seems as though I’ve been ignoring my Horror Themes category. Better sock one in here before the playlist ends up with a giant lyric-less cluster somewhere in the middle.

And if you need a go-to Horror Theme, then Francis Haines’ Return of the Living Dead Main Title Theme will do just fine.

Perfectly creepy, perfectly Halloweeny, The Trioxin Theme is just the break we need from the rock to bring a little ambiance back into the mix.

As soundtracks go (official, purchasable albums that is) The Return of the Living Dead is a great one. Not only is the music awesome, but it chock full of so many great samples from the movie I don’t even need to bust out my DVD to lead them in. Just grab 2 tracks, splice ’em a little and we’re good to go.

From one of the greatest zombie movies ever made, here’s the synthy and spooky Trioxin Theme from The Return of the Living Dead.